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56. Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4)
56. Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4)
Ministry III (Sermon to Multitude, Sermons in parables, Woe to scribes , Talents etc)

56. Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4)

Luke 15, 1-32. Meditation A.D. 30. Age 33. Perea

 Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4). THEN drew near unto Jesus the publicans and sinners for to hear him. The Pharisees and scribes murmured, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.

Jesus spake this parable of the lost sheep unto them, What man of you, having a hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friends and neighbors, saying unto them, Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost.

I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance.

¶Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbors together, saying, Rejoice with me: for I have found the piece which I had lost.

Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.

A certain man had two sons: and the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And he divided unto them his living.

And not many days after, the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living. And when he had spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and he began to be in want.

And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat; and no man gave unto him.

And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father’s have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee, and am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.

And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him.

And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son.

But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: and bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: for this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.

Now his elder son was in the field: and as he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard music and dancing. And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said unto him, Thy brother is come; and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe and sound. And he was angry, and would not go in: therefore came his father out, and entreated him.

And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment; and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends: but as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.

And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.

Scripture: Luke 15:1-10

Meditation 1 of 2: Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4)

 Do you take offense when someone else gets a reward or favor they don’t deserve?  The scribes and Pharisees took great offense at Jesus because he associated with sinners and treated them graciously. The Pharisees had strict regulations about how they were to keep away from sinners, lest they incur defilement. They were not to entrust money to them or have any business dealings with them, nor trust them with a secret, nor entrust orphans to their care, nor accompany them on a journey, nor give their daughter in marriage to any of their sons, nor invite them as guests or be their guests. They were shocked with the way in which Jesus freely received sinners and ate with them. Sinners, nonetheless, were drawn to Jesus to hear him speak about the mercy of God.   Jesus characteristically answered the Pharisees’ charge with a parable or lesson drawn from everyday life.

What does Jesus’ story about a lost sheep and a lost coin tell us about God and his kingdom? Shepherds normally counted their sheep at the end of the day to make sure all were accounted for.  Since sheep by their very nature are very social, an isolated sheep can quickly become bewildered and even neurotic. The shepherd’s grief and anxiety is turned to joy when he finds the lost sheep and restores it to the fold.  The housewife who lost a coin faced something of an economic disaster, since the value of the coin would be equivalent to her husband’s daily wage. What would she say to her husband when he returned home from work?  They were poor and would suffer greatly because of the loss. Her grief and anxiety turn to joy when she finds the coin.  Both the shepherd and the housewife “search until what they have lost is found”.  Their persistence pays off.  They both instinctively share their joy with the whole community.  The poor are particularly good at sharing in one another’s sorrows and joys.  What was new in Jesus’ teaching was the insistence that sinners must be sought out and not merely mourned for.  God does not rejoice in the loss of anyone, but desires that all be saved and restored to fellowship with him.  That is why the whole community of heaven rejoices when one sinner is found and restored to fellowship with God.  Seekers of the lost are much needed today.  Do you persistently pray and seek after those you know who have lost their way to God?

“Lord, let your light dispel the darkness that what is lost may be found and restored.  Let your light shine through me that others may see your truth and love and find hope and peace in you. May I never doubt your love nor take for granted the mercy you have shown to me. Fill me with your transforming love that I may be merciful as you are merciful.” 

Scripture:  Luke 15:11-32

Meditation 2 of 2: Parables of Jesus Sermon (2 of 4)

 The parable of the father and his two sons is the longest one in the gospels.  What is the main point of the story?  Is it the contrast between an obedient and a disobedient son or is it between the reception given to a spendthrift son by the father and the reception given by the eldest son?  Jesus contrasts the father’s merciful love with the eldest son’s somewhat harsh reaction to his errant brother and to the lavish party his joyful father throws for his repentant son. While the errant son had wasted his father’s money, his father, nonetheless, maintained unbroken love for his son.  The son, while he was away, learned a lot about himself. And he realized that his father had given him love which he had not returned. He had yet to learn about the depth of his father’s love for him. His deep humiliation at finding himself obliged to feed on the husks of pigs and his reflection on all he had lost, led to his repentance and decision to declare himself guilty before his father.  While he hoped for reconciliation with his father, he could not have imagined a full restoration of relationship. The father did not need to speak words of forgiveness to his son; his actions spoke more loudly and clearly! The beautiful robe, the ring, and the festive banquet symbolize the new life — pure, worthy, and joyful — of anyone who returns to God.

The prodigal could not return to the garden of innocence, but he was welcomed and reinstated as a son. The errant son’s dramatic change from grief and guilt to forgiveness and restoration express in picture- language the resurrection from the dead, a rebirth to new life from spiritual death.  The parable also contrasts mercy and its opposite — unforgiveness.  The father who had been wronged, was forgiving.  But the eldest son, who had not been wronged, was unforgiving.  His unforgiveness turns into contempt and pride.  And his resentment leads to his isolation and estrangement from the community of forgiven sinners. In this parable Jesus gives a vivid picture of God and what God is like. God is truly kinder than us. He does not lose hope or give up when we stray. He rejoices in finding the lost and in leading them home. Do you know the joy of repentance and restoration of sonship with your heavenly Father?

“Lord, may I never doubt your love nor take for granted the mercy you have shown to me. Fill me with your transforming love that I may be merciful as you are merciful.” 


 

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Ministry III (Sermon to Multitude, Sermons in parables, Woe to scribes , Talents etc)The complete sayings of Jesus
2 Comments on this post.
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  • editor
    1 November 2017 at 6:01 am

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